Smoke Alarm Legislation Changes

There are some new changes occurring to fire safety law – affecting Scotland only at the moment from February 2022. Read our blog to see what changes will be made and how you can prepare so your home is ready.

Scottish Homeowners are being urged to install interlinked heat and smoke alarms before new fire safety laws come into effect next year. From February all homeowners will be required to have interlinked alarms under legislation brought forward after the Grenfell Tower tragedy in 2017. These alarms significantly reduce casualties by alerting everybody in a property to a fire. Most homes will also require a carbon monoxide alarm.

As from February 2022 all homes in Scotland will need to have one smoke alarm in the most frequently used room, one in every circulation space on each storey, and a heat alarm in each kitchen. Alarms should be ceiling mounted and interlinked. Where there is a carbon-fuelled appliance, such as a boiler, fire or flue, a carbon monoxide detector is also required, although this does not need to be linked to the fire alarms.

All these alarms can be either long-life sealed and battery operated, or mains operated. However, mains-operated alarms must be installed by a qualified electrician. 

Q: There are lots of different types of alarms available – which ones should I get and where can I buy them?

A: There are two types of alarms that comply with the new standard:

  1. Tamper proof long-life lithium battery alarms, which can be fitted by householders themselves or;
  2. Mains-wired alarms, which are cheaper than tamper proof long-life battery alarms, but should be installed by a qualified electrician in accordance with BS7671.

Mains-wired alarms, however, are required to be installed by an electrician which will be an additional cost to homeowners. Any re-decoration to walls and/or ceilings should be taken into consideration. You may also need a building warrant if you live in a flat.


Information taken from Fire and smoke alarms: changes to the law - gov.scot (www.gov.scot)